5 tips for an ethical investment in tech stocks

This post was originally published on this site


These days people trading on the stock market want more than just a strong financial return. They’re increasingly opting for investments that will also have a positive societal impact. The coronavirus pandemic showed us even established tech companies can suffer downturns in the short term. Apple, a tech behemoth, was left reeling when Chinese manufacturing hubs were temporarily shut down last year. In the longer term, however, technology stocks remain a first choice for many investors. Historically, they’ve dominated global stock markets and continue to grow at a remarkable rate. Even during the downward spiral of the pandemic, tech stocks…

This story continues at The Next Web

Consent apps don’t stop sexual violence, so quit trying to make them

This post was originally published on this site


Yesterday, New South Wales Police Commissioner Mick Fuller suggested technology should be part of the solution to growing concerns around sexual assault. He encouraged serious discussion about using a digital app to record positive sexual consent. In our research, we have studied a wide range of mobile applications and artificial intelligence (AI) chatbots used in attempts to counter sexual violence over the past decade. We found these apps have many limitations and unexpected consequences. How apps are being used to address sexual abuse Apps aimed at responding to sexual harassment and assault have circulated for at least a decade. With…

This story continues at The Next Web

Super shoes: Explaining athletics’ new performance-enhancing tech

This post was originally published on this site


In the 1960s, when traditional cinder athletics tracks were replaced by spongy, synthetic surfaces, endurance running experienced a revolution. Long-distance runners began clocking far faster times on the synthetic tracks, smashing multiple world records in the process. Today, another revolution is afoot: the development of the so-called “super shoe,” which is driving another spike of record toppling in endurance running. The new shoe technology was introduced to road running in 2016 and track running in 2019, and since those key dates virtually all endurance running world records, from the 5,000m to the marathon, have been broken. This has divided opinion in…

This story continues at The Next Web

Border control systems are gearing up to use facial analysis tech — what could go wrong?

This post was originally published on this site


Developments in global border control technologies are providing innovative ways to address issues relating to migration, asylum-seeking and the introduction of illegal goods into countries. But while governments and national security can benefit from this, advanced surveillance technology creates risks for the misuse of personal data and the violation of human rights. Technology at the border One of US President Joe Biden’s first actions was to introduce a bill that prioritizes “smart border controls”, as part of a commitment to “restore humanity and American values to our immigration system”. These controls will supplement existing resources at the border with Mexico.…

This story continues at The Next Web

Chatbots that resurrect the dead: legal experts weigh in on ‘disturbing’ technology

This post was originally published on this site


It was recently revealed that in 2017 Microsoft patented a chatbot that, if built, would digitally resurrect the dead. Using AI and machine learning, the proposed chatbot would bring our digital persona back to life for our family and friends to talk to. When pressed on the technology, Microsoft representatives admitted that the chatbot was “disturbing” and that there were currently no plans to put it into production. Still, it appears that the technical tools and personal data are in place to make digital reincarnations possible. AI chatbots have already passed the “Turing Test”, which means they’ve fooled other humans…

This story continues at The Next Web

Hey millennials, stop ruining emoji for Gen Z

This post was originally published on this site


When I saw the news that Apple would be releasing 217 new emojis into the world, I did what I always do: I asked my undergraduates what it meant to them. “We barely use them anymore,” they scoffed. To them, many emojis are like overenthusiastic dance moves at weddings: reserved for awkward millennials. “And they use them all wrong anyway,” my cohort from generation Z added earnestly. My work focuses on how people use technology, and I’ve been following the rise of emoji for a decade. With 3,353 characters available and 5 billion sent each day, emojis are now a significant language…

This story continues at The Next Web

Night at the Museum brought to life by new mixed reality tech

This post was originally published on this site


For millions of children, being dragged to a museum is a singularly painful experience, marked by time standing still rather than history coming to life – as it does in the film “Night at the Museum,” starring Ben Stiller. But that all could change with the development of new “mixed reality” (MR) technology, which could inject new forms of interactive storytelling into our museums – introducing holographic tour guides and immersive digital displays in place of finger-smudged glass cabinets and faded information boards. Unlike the total immersion of virtual reality (VR), or the computer screen required for augmented reality (AR),…

This story continues at The Next Web

How to manage your screen time during the lockdown, according to science

This post was originally published on this site


The average daily time spent online by adults increased by nearly an hour during the UK’s spring lockdown when compared to the previous year, according to communications regulator Ofcom. With numerous countries back under severe pandemic restrictions, many of us once again find ourselves questioning whether our heavy reliance on technology is impacting our wellbeing. It’s true that digital devices have provided new means of work, education, connection, and entertainment during lockdown. But the perceived pressure to be online, the tendency to procrastinate to avoid undertaking tasks, and the use of digital platforms as a way to escape distress all…

This story continues at The Next Web

New radio signal excited alien hunters – but scientists are still skeptical

This post was originally published on this site


The US$100m (£70m) Breakthrough Listen Initiative, founded by Russian billionaire, technology, and science investor Yuri Milner and his wife Julia, has identified a mysterious radio signal that seems to come from the nearest star to the Sun – Proxima Centauri. This has generated a flood of excitement in the press and among scientists themselves. The discovery, which was reported by the Guardian but has yet to be published in a scientific journal, may be the search for extraterrestrial intelligence’s (SETI) first bona fide candidate signal. It has been dubbed Breakthrough Listen Candidate 1 or simply BLC-1. Although the Breakthrough Listen…

This story continues at The Next Web