Sonos lawsuit seeks ban on Google Home and Pixel device sales in U.S.

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Sonos might not have any new products to show off at CES, but it’s taking aim at a competitor in an entirely different way. In a lawsuit filed in federal court Tuesday, the speaker maker moved to sue Google for infringing on five of its patents, which Sonos said Google “blatantly and knowingly” copied.

As reported by The New York Times, the lawsuit seeks unspecified financial damages and a ban on the sale of Google’s smart speakers, Pixel phones, and Pixelbook laptops in the U.S. The complaint stems largely from the use of technology that lets speakers communicate and sync with each other over a wireless network.

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Google Pixel 4 XL review: Half great, half-baked

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The Google Pixel 4 XL can lay claim to the only real smartphone breakthrough of the year: a shrunken radar chip that’s so advanced it can detect when you reach for your phone so you’ll never have to stare at a blank screen.

It’s a delightful feature that makes phones with ambient or always-on displays feel like they’re stuck in the past. Combined with Face unlock, the Pixel 4’s Motion Sense technology makes me feel like the phone anticipates all my moves, and this truly saves time by limiting how often I need to tap the screen. Before you even unlock it, the Pixel 4 XL exudes futurity and sets you up for an experience unlike anything you’ll find on a Galaxy or iPhone.

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New zero-day Android exploit targets Pixel, Galaxy phones—and hackers are already using it

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Google’s Project Zero team is warning Pixel, Pixel 2, Galaxy S9, and Huawei P20 owners that a new Android vulnerability could let a hacker take full control of your phone. And what’s worse, there is evidence that it is being actively exploited in the wild.

As first spotted by Ars Technica, the issue was first patched in the December 2017 security update, but several phones are “still vulnerable based on source code review.” According to Google, the phones at risk include:

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How to automatically delete the web activity and location history data in your Google account

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Google is finally taking your privacy seriously. Earlier this year, it rolled out a simpler and more transparent way to access your Location History and Web & App Activity, and delete part or all of it, but it’s effective only if you remember to do it. Now Google is making it easier to do that, too.

Google is rolling out a new account feature that lets you set an expiration date for your data. The options aren’t as granular as we’d like, but you can set a kill date of three or 18 months, so even if you forget to clear it out, a record of the places you visit online and in real life won’t stay around forever. It’s still rolling out to devices, so if you don’t see it on your phone, you can find it on the web. Here’s how to set it up:

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The Huawei rollercoaster continues as Google gets a green light to license Android again

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Barely a month after the U.S. government placed a ban on companies doing business with Huawei due to an unspecified national security threat, President Donald Trump has seemingly softened his hard stance. In a press conference at the G20 Conference Saturday, he announced that “American companies will continue” to do business with the beleaguered telecom giant.

While it’s unclear whether that extends to the 5G network technology that Huawei is developing, it most certainly applies to Google and Android. Under the terms of the previous ban, Google was barred from selling an Android license to Huawei, meaning its phones could use the base open-source code, but would not have access to the all-important Play Store and Google apps.

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Leaked ARM memo suggests Huawei’s losing access to yet more essential technology

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The hits keep coming for Huawei. Following the revocation of its license to use Google apps and the Play Store on its Android phones and a ban by several major chipmakers, including Intel, Broadcom, and Qualcomm, a leaked memo obtained by the BBC has revealed that ARM has ordered its employees to cease “all active contracts, support entitlements, and any pending engagements” with the beleaguered China-based tech giant.

While ARM is a UK-based company, its chip designs contain technology that originated in the U.S. and subsequently are believed to be subject to the Commerce Department’s blanket ban. The memo says ARM employees are no longer able to “provide support, delivery technology (whether software, code, or other updates), engage in technical discussions, or otherwise discuss technical matters.”

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