How COVID-19 will change the world’s 13,000 ‘microcities’ for good

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This article was originally published by Sarah Wray on Cities Today, the leading news platform on urban mobility and innovation, reaching an international audience of city leaders. For the latest updates follow Cities Today on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram, and YouTube, or sign up for Cities Today News. From reinvented shopping malls to pedestrianized suburban neighborhoods and a growing role for technology, ‘microcities’ are changing. A new study from ABI research has identified at least 13,000 microcities around the world. It is the first time the analyst firm has quantified these dense urban developments, which include the areas in and around large airports,…

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Awful parking is the worst thing about escooters — TIER has a plan to fix it

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This article was originally published by Christopher Carey on Cities Today, the leading news platform on urban mobility and innovation, reaching an international audience of city leaders. For the latest updates follow Cities Today on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram, and YouTube, or sign up for Cities Today News. Escooter firm TIER has partnered with mapping provider Fantasmo to create what it claims is the world’s most accurate escooter parking system. Starting in Paris and York, TIER will implement Fantasmo’s “Camera Positioning System” (CPS), a new positioning technology that is ten times more accurate than GPS and can validate e-scooter parking within 50 centimeters or less…

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How high-end cameras and algorithms are making escooters safer

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This article was originally published by Christopher Carey on Cities Today, the leading news platform on urban mobility and innovation, reaching an international audience of city leaders. For the latest updates follow Cities Today on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram, and YouTube, or sign up for Cities Today News. Swedish micromobility firm Voi is adding computer vision technology to its e-scooters to automatically reduce speeds when they enter heavily pedestrianized areas. The firm has partnered with Irish tech startup Luna to implement the technology, which comprises high-end camera sensors. Algorithms interpret input from these sensors, and the data is processed using edge computing – an approach…

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Los Angeles will soon have an ‘innovation zone’ for testing mobility products

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This article was originally published by Christopher Carey on Cities Today, the leading news platform on urban mobility and innovation, reaching an international audience of city leaders. For the latest updates follow Cities Today on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram, and YouTube, or sign up for Cities Today News. Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti has announced the creation of the city’s first Transportation Technology Innovation Zone – an area where private sector firms can test their transportation technology solutions. Designed by Mayor Garcetti and City Councilmember Bob Blumenfield, the zone is one of the flagship programs of Urban Movement Labs (UML) – the transportation solutions…

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Lime and What3words team up to clean up abandoned escooters

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This article was originally published by Christopher Carey on Cities Today, the leading news platform on urban mobility and innovation, reaching an international audience of city leaders. For the latest updates follow Cities Today on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram, and YouTube, or sign up for Cities Today News. Micromobility firm Lime has partnered with mapping provider what3words to help members of the public report mis-parked e-bikes and scooters more easily. The mapping company’s technology divides the earth’s surface into 57 trillion three-meter squares. A unique three-word address is assigned to each square, intended to identify exact locations that are not captured by conventional address systems,…

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