Privacy advocates say Amazon’s plans to put AI cameras in vans will create ‘mobile surveillance machines’

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Amazon’s plans to install AI-powered cameras in its delivery vans have been slammed by privacy advocates as “the largest expansion of corporate surveillance in human history.” The e-commerce giant has been testing a system that provides real-time monitoring of the roads and drivers. In an instructional video first reported by The Information, Amazon said the cameras record drivers on their route “100% of the time.” The company told Reuters that it recently started rolling out the tech across its delivery fleet: This technology will provide drivers real-time alerts to help them stay safe when they are on the road. The system,…

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As Clubhouse gets a boost from Elon Musk, its audio partner’s shares are soaring

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Audio-based social network Clubhouse is having a hell of a week after Elon Musk appeared on a session and caused its rooms to overflow. Now, there’s a frenzy of people trying to get into the invite-only social network. For the uninitiated, Clubhouse is an iOS-only app — backed by venture firm Andreessen Horowitz (a16z)  — where users create rooms and chat to each other through audio in real-time. Apart from Clubhouse, its audio technology partner Agora is also basking in glory as its share prices have gone up over 50% from the last Friday’s closing price. Its stock went from…

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How playing the hardest games I could find helped me take back my mental health

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Disclaimer: nothing in this article should be constituted as mental health advice. This is anecdotal evidence from a technology journalist. I’ve been a gamer since the early 1980s. I cut my teeth on Tempest and Donkey Kong in the local arcade. Gaming is my solace. When big things happen in my life or in the world, and I need to wrap my head around them, my go-to coping mechanism is to play a game until I can think clearly and focus. This is how I’ve always blown off mental steam (for lack of a better way to put it). But…

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These Streaming Services Still Offer Free Trials

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People are watching a lot of streaming TV—the average person subscribes to five streaming services—but more and more of us are also becoming “hit and run” subscribers, cancelling at least one service in the last six months, according to Deloitte. Part of this is cost-related—all those monthly fees and up. Plus, why…

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6 Alternative Apps For Frustrated Robinhood Users

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Let’s say you’re angry with Robinhood after they unexpectedly restricted the trading of “memestocks” last week, and maybe the app is too gamified for your comfort, and perhaps you’re simply looking for an brokerage platform offering more features or research information—here’s a look at some stock trading app…

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Google Stadia shuts down first-party game studios, which isn’t a great sign

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Google is shutting down its internal game development studios, the company announced today. Google says it has decided to focus on expanding Stadia’s technology and platform rather than creating original content. In Google’s own words: Creating best-in-class games from the ground up takes many years and significant investment, and the cost is going up exponentially. Given our focus on building on the proven technology of Stadia as well as deepening our business partnerships, we’ve decided that we will not be investing further in bringing exclusive content from our internal development team SG&E, beyond any near-term planned games. The company also…

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Police say they can use facial recognition, despite bans

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Mere hours after supporters of former president Donald Trump forced their way into the Capitol Building on Jan. 6, sleuths, both amateur and professional, took up the task of combing through the voluminous videos and photos on social media to identify rioters. Facial recognition technology — long reviled by police reform advocates as inaccurate and racially biased — was suddenly everywhere. A college student in Washington, D.C., used facial recognition to extract faces from videos on social media. The Washington Post used facial recognition to count the number of individual faces at the Capitol Building attack, and a researcher from Citizen Lab used it to identify people…

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