Intel’s Iris Xe Max GPU brings graphics chops to thin-and-light laptops

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Intel claimed Saturday that its new Iris Xe Max graphics can outperform Nvidia’s GeForce MX350 in gaming, and even top a GeForce RTX 2080 in some encoding tasks. How it does that—through power sharing, and an Intel technology called Deep Link—could make the package of an 11th-gen Core Tiger Lake CPU and an Iris Xe Max GPU a spec to look for in future laptops.

Code-named DG1, Intel’s first discrete GPU since 1998’s Intel i740 will appear in mainstream thin-and-light PCs like the Acer Swift 3x, Asus VivoBook Flip TP470, and Dell Inspiron 15 7000 2-in-1. The Iris Xe Max faces off against Nvidia’s GeForce MX350 and MX450, both discrete mobile GPUs that split the difference between a gaming-class mobile GPU and the integrated graphics included in mobile Ryzen and Core processors.

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AMD Radeon RX 6800, 6800 XT, and 6900 XT aim at Nvidia’s best—even the RTX 3090

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Welcome back to the high end, AMD.

For the first time since the days of the Radeon R9 290X—seven long years ago—AMD’s Radeon group is prepared to unleash enthusiast-level graphics cards that can do battle with Nvidia’s best and brightest. During the company’s second “Where Gaming Begins” event on Wednesday, AMD revealed a trio of Radeon GPUs based on a new RDNA 2 architecture, all armed with “revolutionary Infinity Cache” technology, sky-high clock speeds, and interesting synergies with Ryzen. They take direct aim at Nvidia’s RTX 30-series offerings, culminating in a $999 Radeon RX 6900 XT that seeks to seize the gaming crown from the monstrous $1500 GeForce RTX 3090 when it launches December 8—for $500 less than Nvidia’s beastly GPU costs.

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Windows 10 tips and tricks that help you get stuff done faster

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Time may not necessarily be money, but it still matters. Every second you spend wading through context menus or clunkily navigating Windows is a second you could be doing something you love instead. And with so much of modern life tied up in technology, those wasted seconds can add up fast.

Now it’s time to reclaim those lost seconds, minutes, and hours. These simple Windows 10 tips and tricks aren’t glamorous and most aren’t even new to the Start menu-swapping October 2020 Update, to be honest, but when deployed together they can seriously streamline your workflow.

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Which iPhone 12 Accessories Should You Wait to Buy?

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While there’s a lot of new technology coming with the iPhone 12, Apple is also making a move to reduce “e-waste” by giving you less stuff in your iPhone box. Taken together, these two facts mean that you’ll probably end up spending anywhere from “a little bit” to “a lot” more money after buying your brand-new iPhone…

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Nab Free Food With These Fast-Food Apps

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If you’re looking for free fast food, loyalty apps often have the best deals. Digital coupons usage has finally exceeded paper coupons (according to Inmar Intelligence) during the pandemic, but a big part of that trend is the growth of mobile rewards programs. With brands investing heavily in apps, expect them to be…

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It’s Time to Audit Your Autopay Subscriptions

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How many subscription services do you pay for? A study by the tech consulting firm West Monroe found that the average American spends $237 a month on autopay subscriptions, or $2,844 for the year, and most of them underestimate what they think they owe. If you’re not sure what you’re spending, it’s time to audit your…

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AMD rising and Arm Macs: How Intel’s endless 10nm struggles cost it so much

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Intel’s endless 10nm nightmare has cost it so, so much.

It all started on September 5, 2014. That’s the day Intel introduced 5th-gen Core M chips based on “Broadwell,” the company’s first processors built using the 14-nanometer manufacturing process. Despite some manufacturing woes that pushed Broadwell back from its expected 2013 release, Intel’s offering served as the vanguard of processor technology. AMD remained stuck on the 28nm process with its abysmal Bulldozer architecture. A mere month later, the Apple iPad Air 2 launched with a custom A8X chip that couldn’t quite hang with Intel’s older Haswell CPUs in Geekbench—but it was getting close.

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