AMD adds Radeon Image Sharpening to Vega GPUs and Radeon VII after backlash

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AMD released a driver update on Monday that added Radeon Image Sharpening support to its Radeon Vega-based graphics cards, including the Radeon VII. Doing so effectively ended a minor kerfuffle surrounding the new and awesome technology.

Radeon Image Sharpening debuted in AMD’s excellent Radeon RX 5700 series graphics cards in July. Here’s how we described it then: “Radeon Image Sharpening uses algorithms to intelligently sharpen only the areas that need it, reducing the blurriness that can pop up when you activate various anti-aliasing methods or run games at a lower resolution than your display’s maximum. Better yet, it does so with next to no performance impact.”  

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How to Fix Bluetooth Audio Stuttering

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Bluetooth technology is a ubiquitous part of our lives, and a crucial tool in the fight against cord clutter. It’s also notoriously finicky. And when your laptop, phone, or other device is hooked up via Bluetooth to a wireless speaker or pair of headphones and the audio playback starts to stutter, it can be nothing…

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Intel maps out Optane’s future and says Penta Level Cell NAND is in the works

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In a massive storage data dump, Intel laid out its Optane roadmap and claimed an edge in Penta Level Cell NAND technology. That’s not even mentioning the company’s plans for fatter SSDs, and how long it’ll take to get persistent memory to consumer PCs.

The announcements were made Thursday morning at a storage event in Seoul, South Korea, where Intel showed off some new technology coming down the pike. Intel also announced that, after the very public and amicable divorce from Micron, it’s moving its Optane development to Rancho Rio, New Mexico.

Optane Roadmap: Barlow Pass

If you’ve had a hint that Intel’s been closely aligning its storage efforts with its CPU efforts, that hint turned into a nudge on Thursday: Intel confirmed that its upcoming Cooper Lake and Ice Lake CPUs will have support for its 2nd-generation Optane DC Persistent Memory modules. Codenamed Barlow Pass, the Optane modules will be closely tied with the upcoming Xeon CPUs. And yup, a yet unnamed, but rumored-to-be-called Crow Pass will be tied with its upcoming Sapphire Rapids Xeon CPUs. 

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Sony XBR 950G 4K UHD smart TV review: Dated technology with a state-of-the-art price tag

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There’s a lot to like about Sony’s 950G 4K UHD TV: It has that Sony style, a new more lux remote, and good video processing. But the dated color palette and blacks can’t match that of TVs costing significantly less.

HP buys Bromium to apply virtualization security to its PCs

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HP acquired security company Bromium, announcing the purchase on Thursday afternoon. Much as Intel, AMD, Nvidia, Microsoft, and other major vendors hoard key pieces of computer technology, HP may be trying to corner the market on a unique piece of browser technology it already uses. 

Bromium technology already underlies HP’s Sure Click feature, which locks every individual browser tab inside of its own virtual machine. Theoretically, any piece of malware on the tab can’t “see” anything more than the tab upon which it resides, protecting the browser as well as the PC host.

Bromium also supplies what it calls Secure File technology, which does the same for each individual download—Office documents, PDFs, and the works. If the file isn’t marked as trusted, it will be opened in what Bromium calls a micro virtual machine.

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Samsung’s ultra-fast new PCIe 4.0 SSDs ‘never die’

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Samsung said new software for its latest PCIe 4.0 SSDs make them so reliable, they can essentially “never die.”

Three new software features were announced in total, with two tied to data integrity: a virtualization technology dubbed “V-NAND machine learning technology” to verify data, and “fail-in-place.” Officials said FIP allows an SSD continue running normally even during chip-level failures.

Fail-in-place can detect a failed or failing NAND chip, check for damaged data, and then move that data to undamaged parts of the drive. Samsung cited its 30.72TB PM1733 SSD, which contains 512 NAND chips inside. If any of those 512 chips failed, lit would continue to roll along.

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Orico USB 3.1 NVMe SSD enclosure review: Fast, easy, and affordable

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Orico’s M.2 NVMe USB 3.1 enclosure is fast, easy to assemble, and if you like your inner technology visible–quite handsome. It’s also half the price of the Fledging Shell I’ll be comparing it to. Sounds great. Is it?

Design and specs

Clearly, transparent/see-through is a thing with Orico (pun intended), as you’ll see if you visit the Orico website. I’m not a huge fan of revealing a product’s innards, nor am I dead-set against it. It’s simply a matter of taste. Coupled with the anodized blue heat sink, I think the product works pretty well visually in this case. The top half/cover slides back slightly and decouples so you can access the internals.

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