John Ronan’s new building at IIT is clearly unique, thoughtful — but questions cloud its future

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A new building at the Illinois Institute of Technology looks and works like no other building in Chicago. It exemplifies an emerging trend in architecture — a “dynamic facade” that can tune a building to its climate.

The second floor of the two-story, steel-framed structure is enclosed in a technologically…

The Full Nerd special episode: Intel’s storage chief talks Optane, the death of hard drives, and the future of storage

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In this episode of the Full Nerd, Gordon Mah Ung and Adam Patrick Murray are joined by Intel storage chief Bill Leszinske to discuss all things about data drives.

What’s up with Optane now that Intel and Micron’s joint development has ended? Why does Intel call it a “system accelerator” rather than a caching solution? Why haven’t U.2 drives or SATA Express taken off? When will hard drives die for good? We discuss all that and more, also indulging in some nostalgia before Bill wraps things up with predictions of what to expect from storage technology in the years to come.

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How to manage and delete your Google search history

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We already know Google collects a ton of data on us, and a lot of it comes from search. Google offers plenty of ways to limit the amount of data you have lying around, but they’re not all that easy to find. Starting today, Google is making it easier to both see and delete your search activity.

Previously, you could visit your Google Account in Settings on Android phones or on the web on iOS, tap Manage your data & personalization and then My Activity to see your search results. Then you needed to tap the three-dot menu and select Delete to get rid of something. Finding your search history on desktops was just as cumbersome.

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Amazon’s huge one-day sale slashes prices on external storage, flash drives, and SD cards

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How to Buy Replacement Parts for Your Motorola Phone

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A few years ago when I cracked my iPhone 5 screen for the 20th time, I ordered a repair kit from iFixit and repaired it myself. Replacing the display was surprisingly easy, and doing it myself was considerably cheaper than getting Apple or someone else to do it. So easy I started offering to do it for my friends if…

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Qualcomm begins shipping 802.11ay silicon for mobile devices and applications, including VR and UHD video

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Qualcomm has begun shipping a family of 60GHz Wi-Fi chipsets for both mobile and infrastructure applications that uses the new IEEE 802.11ay specification. Think of 802.11ay as a supplement to traditional Wi-Fi, with real-world throughput of more than 7 gigabits per second (Gbps), according to a company spokesperson.

In addition to the 2.4GHz and 5GHz bands currently in use by Wi-Fi routers and other devices, 60GHz technology is expected to be sort of a high-speed, short-range supplement. The type of applications Qualcomm is targeting include wireless VR and ultra high-definition video streaming. Qualcomm also powers numerous smartphones.

What we didn’t know was exactly how fast Qualcomm expects data to move, and over what distances. Those questions were answered Wednesday. According to a company spokesperson, the 802.11ay spec is theoretically capable of moving data through silicon at more than 10Gbps. In the real world, though, the actual throughput should be more than 7 Gbps.

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